Difference between Fame and Infamy


One might say that the difference between fame and infamy is the difference between corruption and immortality. Both make a tremendous amount of noise and both are remembered, but one is seen as corrupt and disturbing, while the other is seen as a paragon of virtue. Two sides of the same coin.

Both make a tremendous amount of noise and both are remembered, but one is seen as corrupt and disturbing, while the other is seen as a paragon of virtue.


Two sides of the same coin.

Fame is defined by most dictionaries as the condition of being talked about by lots of people and being well known.

This usually involves a major achievement or a plethora of achievements. Because fame is widespread good reputation, it has a positive connotation.

Infamy, on the other hand, is the condition of being known or talked about due to scandals, evil actions, failures that affect many people, criminal activity or societal taboos.

The person who is infamous has a widespread bad reputation, and thus the word infamy has a negative connotation.

People aren’t the only ones who are famous or infamous. Cities, countries, foods and objects can have such qualities attributed to them as well.

A person who does good deeds could be considered infamous in a close-minded, dictatorship-run country.

It’s all about perspective. In life, you can do things that make you famous and liked by everyone, yet get there through secret shady deals and nefarious actions.

On the other hand, you can perform acts that others might consider manipulative and evil yet achieve a tremendous positive result like curing some kind of disease, yet to get there you did things you didn’t want to do but did them anyway to get to your result.

In conclusion: fame is positive attention, infamy is negative attention.